The first “for dogs, from dogs” canine bacterial GI support product launches in the UK - Veterinary Practice
Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×

The first “for dogs, from dogs” canine bacterial GI support product launches in the UK

Procanicare is an ideal support product to maintain balance in the GI intestinal microbiome of dogs

The first bacterial GI support product developed from the intestinal bacteria of healthy dogs has landed in the UK. Delivering the benefits of three live strains of canine specific Lactobacillus bacteria, Procanicare, from Animalcare, is an ideal GI support product to maintain balance in the GI intestinal microbiome of dogs, particularly when dysbiosis is a risk.

Adhesion of bacteria to the epithelial cells of the intestine has been shown to be host species specific but most other commercially available canine bacterial GI support products are of porcine, avian or human origin. The three live strains of Lactobacillus found in Procanicare were carefully selected after a series of studies isolated the most appropriate species for commercial use from the intestinal microbiome of healthy dogs.

There is increasing evidence of the important roles that the intestinal microbiome has, not just locally in the gut but across the body. Alterations to the intestinal microbiome (dysbiosis) can therefore have widespread impacts on health. It has been shown that, with no intervention, the intestinal microbiome can take years to recover from dysbiosis.

Many of the effects that bacteria have upon the GI tract and wider body are bacterial species specific. The Lactobacillus found in Procanicare have been shown to promote indigenous intestinal commensal populations, reduce numbers of potentially pathogenic bacteria and improve stool consistency. In addition, Lactobacillus species have been certified by the EFSA to present no pathogenic or antimicrobial resistance risk.

Dr Shea Beasley, Product Development Manager at Vetcare Ltd was involved in the development of Procanicare and has seen its success in other countries. ‘’The strains of Lactobacillusfound in Procanicare have been commercially available in Scandinavia for two years now. It has achieved great success, with Scandinavian vets frequently recommending it in situations where the gastrointestinal microbiota can become unstable such as following antibiotic use and in stressful situations such as travelling and kennelling, as well as when supporting the intestinal microbiome is particularly important, such as during pregnancy and lactation.’’

Available exclusively through vets, Animalcare has produced a range of waiting room materials to help you educate about and promote Procanicare in practice, including a poster, bunting, leaflet and leaflet holder. In addition there is a free webinar for veterinary professionals on the importance of the intestinal microbiome, available to view at The Webinar Vet’s website.

To find out more or to try Procanicare in your practice, contact your local Animalcare representative via email animalcare@animalcare.co.uk or telephone 01904 487687.

References

Kumar S, et al.

2017

Comparative assessment of canine-origin Lactobacillus johnsonii CPN23 and dairy origin Lactobacillus acidophillus NCDC 15 for nutrient digestibility, faecal fermentative metabolites and selected gut health indices in dogs. Journal of Nutritional Science, 6:e38

Beasley S. et al.

2006

Lactic acid bacteria isolated from canine faeces. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 101, pp.131-138

Manninen T. et al.

2006

Alteration of the canine small-intestinal lactic acid bacterium microbiota by feeding of potential probiotics. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 72, pp.6539-6543

Grzeskowiak L. et al.

2014

Pathogen exclusion properties of canine probiotics are influenced by the growth media and physical treatments simulating industrial processes. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 116, pp.1308-1314

Gomez-Gallego C. et al.

2016

A canine-specific probiotic product in treating acute or intermittent diarrhea in dogs: A double-blind placebo-controlled efficacy study. Veterinary Microbiology, 197, pp.122-128

Jakobsson H. et al.

2010

Short-Term Antibiotic Treatment Has Differing Long-Term Impacts on the Human Throat and Gut Microbiome. PLOS ONE, Volume 5, Issue 3, e9836

Veterinary Practice

Improve Veterinary Practice (part of the Improve International Group) is an online knowledge and information hub for veterinary professionals across all specialties. It provides reliable, useful and interesting content, written by expert authors and covering small animal, large animal, exotics, equine and practice management
sectors of the veterinary surgeon and nursing professions.

Improve Veterinary Practice also offers a subscription-based membership, offering CPD courses and much more for the whole veterinary community.

Improve Veterinary Practice exists to inspire and inform your day-to-day work, and enable your ongoing professional development.


More from this author

Have you heard about our
IVP Membership?

A wide range of veterinary CPD and resources by leading veterinary professionals.

Stress-free CPD tracking and certification, you’ll wonder how you coped without it.

Discover more